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2 hours ago

Unknown 2/0 (slight overshank) - from a photo of an original (sorry forget whose) - only departure from the original, took the hackle further down the body and changed the tag yellow (was the same as body). Like the compound tag - I assume the original was somewhat bigger than this one. Dx

PS The original hook is very similar.

Unknown 2/0 (slight overshank) - from a photo of an original (sorry forget whose) - only departure from the original, took the hackle further down the body and changed the tag yellow (was the same as body). Like the compound tag - I assume the original was somewhat bigger than this one. Dx

PS The original hook is very similar.
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Love that body, with the black and yellow. Great fly overall.

3 days ago

Read a few articles recently posted by William Blacker and Jason Lewis regarding the Parson and its history so I thought I would tie one up quickly. Lovely little pattern.

Read a few articles recently posted by William Blacker and Jason Lewis regarding the Parson and its history so I thought I would tie one up quickly. Lovely little pattern. ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Beautiful fly mate

Tidy flee 👌

Love you fly, it is on my todo list also,you are motivating me for sure

Very nice 👍🏻

Lovely fly, Richard. There is some info on the Parson flies on the website as well. Find it under «Patterns - Parson Series».

Terrific work, Richard!

Love this one. Been trying to fast track my WIP out of my vise to start one.

Thank you gents.

Like it

Very nice Parson indeed.

1 day ago

3/0 Champion-ish fly from an interesting vintage collection I’ve recently had the pleasure of seeing. WD wasn’t an underwing and was indeed shorter but I lengthened it to balance it out. Pretty chuffed overall!Image attachment

3/0 Champion-ish fly from an interesting vintage collection I’ve recently had the pleasure of seeing. WD wasn’t an underwing and was indeed shorter but I lengthened it to balance it out. Pretty chuffed overall! ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Nicely done Tony

Really good one, nice far body and a complex wing. Nice job on the different shades of yellow. Is that some special hook or?

I like it, very nice Tony.

3 days ago

Gordon...tied Dee’ish due to the long shank

Gordon...tied Dee’ish due to the long shank ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Sweet flow! Well done as always!🤩

Nice one Stuart!

I see you have an experimental side to you. Fits the hook nicely, sir. Well done.

Nice..i guess Gordons have to be tied with long shanks , they had to be big flies for high colured water After a flood.

2 days ago

The Grey Rover, 2/0.

AS requested by Anthony. 

Very weird pattern. I had very narrow peacock herl for the body, so had to us three of them. Should have fattened up that part too a bit. 

Wing, I let the duck feathers dominate. Not much to say really. Oh yeah, tied in the horns differently, though, I think these are now the wrong side out, but still. Did the body hackle as a butt, and the osterich in front of that, like on the Shannon pattern from Francis. 

So, now I have to give the curse to the next person... hmmm... who will it be... I do have one individual in mind, so let’s hope he does not get too angry with me; Stefano Tieri, go crazy, if you may! 😁

The Grey Rover, 2/0.

AS requested by Anthony.

Very weird pattern. I had very narrow peacock herl for the body, so had to us three of them. Should have fattened up that part too a bit.

Wing, I let the duck feathers dominate. Not much to say really. Oh yeah, tied in the horns differently, though, I think these are now the wrong side out, but still. Did the body hackle as a butt, and the osterich in front of that, like on the Shannon pattern from Francis.

So, now I have to give the curse to the next person... hmmm... who will it be... I do have one individual in mind, so let’s hope he does not get too angry with me; Stefano Tieri, go crazy, if you may! 😁
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

As always a great job Stig, im sure will not be easy to tie this fly with 35°c in my house, this is the right input i needed 🙂

You've made that look half decent lol

Love it! Especially the dominant duck wing!

SUPERB!!

A new mission of the forum... making hideous patterns tasteful 😂

I suspect the quill is brown peacock rachis. Pity you don't have Swiss' talent for tying ugly : )

The shape you get on your flies is just superb!!🥇🥇🥇

Absolutely stunning!!! That shape 😍😍!!

Stig weres the dressing for this version ta

1 day ago

Do you tie a tinsel body only wrapping the tinsel one way? Or do you wrap one way and then back over the other way? ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

One way normally

I dont remember where I read it, but one of the old texts says to wrap it back and then forward. I almost never do it though

Allways two ways, to cover the winds rightly on the butt.

I only ever do one layer in touching turns.

Should only be one layer - that's a definite in ALL the original books, with a taper cut into the start to ensure you don't get the kink at the start. Dx

Two layers, wrapping back and forward, is something you do with Mylar tinsel. With metal tinsels you only do one way, smooth surface under and tight wraps.

Pryce T tags, he wraps over

We're talking about bodies.

I’ve stripped antiques where the tags were wrapped over. Tied in at the butt, wrapped back, then up again over itself. Flat tinsel. Have not seen it done on a body.

2 days ago

Submitted for your analysis ;) 

MILITIAMAN (5/0sh)

Been wanting to tie this one for a long time. I borrowed some variations that Dave applied to the pattern, like the toppings in the wing and, I think, the light turkey. These toppings are a bit pale so doubled em up on the wing.

Pretty happy with it. Hook is my #12.

Cheers!

Submitted for your analysis 😉

MILITIAMAN (5/0'sh)

Been wanting to tie this one for a long time. I borrowed some variations that Dave applied to the pattern, like the toppings in the wing and, I think, the light turkey. These toppings are a bit pale so doubled em up on the wing.

Pretty happy with it. Hook is my #12.

Cheers!
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Damn mate... that’s a gorgeous fly Well done

Bingo!

P.S. I noticed something cool on the example in the Farlows book. The guy that tied it added 1 tinsel wrap to each section (so 6,7,8 then 9 for example). The end result is almost unnoticeable but gives a good balance to the sections. So that's what I did with this one.

Can you mail to me a half dozen for closer analysis?

Lovely job - it was actually anderson's tail I added into the wing. Dx

That is lovely!!!!

Absolutley gorgeous!

Exquisite proportions! Everything really flows together nicely! It would be hard to tell the difference between your flies and Dx's flies!

BEAUTIFUL

Nice one I like everything about it

Lovely!

5 days ago

The Lemon Grey, size 2/0. 

Hale/Kelson, and a bit of everything. Wanted to do a full tippet underwing too. Would love some feedback on this, as I feel there’s something a bit off. I wanted to do a longer body on this one, but feel I could have gotten more length out of it, so the tag a bit long perhaps? Wing a bit short? Tail to long? 

Happy with it though, in general. Tried to keep the head narrower than usual, keeping to about six thread wraps wide.

The Lemon Grey, size 2/0.

Hale/Kelson, and a bit of everything. Wanted to do a full tippet underwing too. Would love some feedback on this, as I feel there’s something a bit off. I wanted to do a longer body on this one, but feel I could have gotten more length out of it, so the tag a bit long perhaps? Wing a bit short? Tail to long?

Happy with it though, in general. Tried to keep the head narrower than usual, keeping to about six thread wraps wide.
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Superb fly. Dx

Beautiful works! Only thing I would say is the wing could be a tad longer as you already suggested! Full Flex wishes my friend,!

Superbly done!!!🥇🥇

I think it is killer, exactly as is. Would love to see horns flow with the wing is all. I think they should be tied in a tad higher, so their orientation changes.

Wish my flies came out half as nice as that. I love the flow of your flies.

Nothing wrong with it . Even like the longish tag. Great work

this fly is top notch

Looks like it’s in a stream, in motion... awesome.

Superb fly and nice flow!

Let me know when you are ready for a reworked trade hehe

2 days ago

Photos from Phil Jones's post ... See MoreSee Less

2 days ago

Highland Gem

Highland Gem ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Cracking job. Dx

Lovely 👍🏻

Gorgeous. I love how you make those Toucan subs work.

4 days ago

Hi and thanks for letting me join your group! Ive been tying flies for two years now. A couple days ago I saw the pattern Gold ranger for the first time, from another post in here and decided to give it a go. This one is my second mixed-wing pattern ever and its tied on a 1/0 hook. The kingfisher cheek apparently lives its own life because it doesnt want to settle in the position I tied it in! 🤭

Hi and thanks for letting me join your group! I've been tying flies for two years now. A couple days ago I saw the pattern "Gold ranger" for the first time, from another post in here and decided to give it a go. This one is my second mixed-wing pattern ever and it's tied on a 1/0 hook. The kingfisher cheek apparently lives its own life because it doesn't want to settle in the position I tied it in! 🤭 ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

A very good effort I will have to say! And welcome to the forum!

Had to take a few looks at this one. I really like it. The only thing that is off, is the topping. It really shouldn't be so long that it meets the tail. In this example, I think the length of the Peacock Swords would have sufficed, and the stem of it, has to hug the wing edge, not fly with a wide gap between topping and wing. Flattening the white bits on the topping with your thumbnail would help you achieve this. It takes practise, but it really isn't that hard once you 'get' it... Looking forward to more from you. Welcome aboard!

4 days ago

Hi, just a little question, do you always wash yours feathers, as it's seem that this process curve them (wooduck, mallard, etc ...)

Thanks for your help ! best
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

I only wash them, in case of dying, because is important to take off the natural fat that doesn’t permit the color to be absorbed. The only thing I put In hot water are the pheasant crests, that after few minutes in very hot water, and than lye in a glass surface, it helps the shaping of the curve of the crest. Hoping to be helpful...🤙🏻

To revitalise feathers that took a wrong shape, I use the steam and a massage with the fingers to shape them correctly. Beside these situations, I never wash the feathers.

I wash them then let us dry. then steam and put them flat in a book. I dont usually wash duck feathers if them are not dirty, only steam if are just deformed

Can only agree, duck normally dont need to be washed or steamed. Only when dyeing them.

Thanks Anders !

Sometimes

I wash them, and it amazes me how dirty they usually turnout to be, even if they looked clean. I agree, however, that washing isn’t really needed. After they’re dry, I steam them, preen them, pair them and store them in ziplock bags, one pair per bag. The zip lock bags help flatten them, like Stefano does with his book. Works wonders.

Thanks Robert ! do you think that the curve of feathers can have influence on tying them ? just to know what all of you think about this ...

They always remain a little curved. This curve is easily used to force them in place against a main wing.

Thanks !

1 week ago

3/0 Grey Rover from Hardy plate. Very happy with the wing and overall shape of things... Front hackle could’ve been longer, but oh well... used a honey dun instead of grizzled or plain grey. I’m in agreement with senor Matt Bagshaw this may be the ugliest pattern ever created. I challenge someone to make this fly as pretty as possible... Stig Larssen, you’re it! Let’s see what people can do with this pattern!

3/0 Grey Rover from Hardy plate. Very happy with the wing and overall shape of things... Front hackle could’ve been longer, but oh well... used a honey dun instead of grizzled or plain grey. I’m in agreement with senor Matt Bagshaw this may be the ugliest pattern ever created. I challenge someone to make this fly as pretty as possible... Stig Larssen, you’re it! Let’s see what people can do with this pattern! ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Pardon my laziness in not looking it up for myself, but what's that rear body section? Looks like stripped quill?

Exactly Spencer Seim!

Oh my, my, my! Such a beautiful fly!

Ugly as sin. Dx

I like unconventional. Maybe a better tapered body section would improve this example.

I’m it?! And you chose this pattern? Well! I’m going to us the pattern off Roberts site, then, and this does look a little different from that. Anyways, game on. You did very good here though, wing profile is very nice!

Absolutely hideous. Love it 😉

5 days ago

Size 6/0....it’s given me a headache! The head got away from me a little as well.

Size 6/0....it’s given me a headache! The head got away from me a little as well. ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Superfly! 😉

Stunning flee Stuart 👌👌

Superb job - though I find that yellow a bit nasty. Dx

Really nice job Stuart. Cannot see anything wrong with that head.

Really beautiful fly, Nice tying.

Head looks bang on to me.

Lovely work, sir. Those Toucan subs set it up, and the overall proportions are superb. I think that a fatter JC nail would have suited better. Have a look at some plates, like the ones in the Badminton Library on the website. Big eyes 😉

Cracker

1 week ago

The (FG) Morgan at 2/0. Dx

The (FG) Morgan at 2/0. Dx ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

The nicest I’ve seen tied. Sublime work as always.

Best tinsel body I've seen!

Nice fly Dave.. The body is spot on my friend

Excellent stuff

Stunning fly. Hard to imagine better fly tying tbh

Never seen this patter. Like a Glitter Mar Lodge. Love your rendition.

7 days ago

Almost 40 years ago I took a tying class over the winter in preparation for a month in New Yorks Catskills learning to fly fish. While pursuing 10 inch Brook Trout I tied everything conceivable, including a Durham Ranger that fortunately was lost to history because I finally realized how terrible it was. I tied two more classics in the 90s prior to my first trip to the Umba. Over the last five years Ive added 7 more, including the current offering that fulfils my desire to mentally razor that first fly and start again. So, this is #10 for me. It is tied on a #2 Heritage PT hook and after Pryce-Tannett, except for the wool head which I wanted to try. Needless to say this is a far better effort than the fly in 1979. Its fully gutted and ready to fish.

Almost 40 years ago I took a tying class over the winter in preparation for a month in New York's Catskills learning to fly fish. While pursuing 10 inch Brook Trout I tied everything conceivable, including a Durham Ranger that fortunately was lost to history because I finally realized how terrible it was. I tied two more classics in the 90s prior to my first trip to the Umba. Over the last five years I've added 7 more, including the current offering that fulfils my desire to mentally razor that first fly and start again. So, this is #10 for me. It is tied on a #2 Heritage PT hook and after Pryce-Tannett, except for the wool head which I wanted to try. Needless to say this is a far better effort than the fly in 1979. It's fully gutted and ready to fish. ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Looks amazing lovely work 👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻

Yup, lovely fly and a nice story.

1 week ago

Attempt at Red Ranger 2/0

Attempt at Red Ranger 2/0 ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Not too bad overall. Your topping is too long, it can never be longer than the tail, and you’ve wrapped tying thread over the topping beyond your tie in point, causing it to curve downward at the head. For toppings, find tie in point and use pincers to make a sharp fold in the rachis. This way, it’ll flow nicely with the wing. I think you should strip the head and redo the wing 🙂

I’ll just redo the whole thing 🙂

1 week ago

The squeezer out of Farlows
Sz 2 antique hook
Excuse the longish gut, small as I could get it at that diameter 
Cool little pattern 
Comments and critique always appreciated.

The squeezer out of Farlows
Sz 2 antique hook
Excuse the longish gut, small as I could get it at that diameter
Cool little pattern
Comments and critique always appreciated.
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Like this one a lot - have given up using gut altogether as twisted clear nylon is better (done using a gut twister type thing and a heat gun) a actually (when messed with) looks more like real new gut than old gut does. Dx

I love this fly. A bit of an oddball dressing, but it has produced some really nice fish for me

Very cool fly. Nice job! Have not seen that pattern before, need to add this one to my list.

1 week ago

Unknown pattern - tied from a pic of an original - basically a mixed wing Shannon. This is the second time Ive tied this - previously I did it on a full long dee as per the original fly - wanted better proportions so used one of my favourite new hook reworks (3/0 overshank). Wing scruffy but very close to the original. Dx

Unknown pattern - tied from a pic of an original - basically a mixed wing Shannon. This is the second time I've tied this - previously I did it on a full long dee as per the original fly - wanted better proportions so used one of my favourite new hook reworks (3/0 overshank). Wing scruffy but very close to the original. Dx ... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago

I have not used in this format  classic hooks and gut, but I try to do more tight to pattern, of corse there are subtituted matherial. I hope that it will be critics and remarks.

from Macintosh Alexander partern The Tartan Fly

**CHAPTER XI.**

**OF SALMON FLIES.**

**THESE**, for the spring season, must be made

much larger, but not quite so gaudy as those

used in summer, viz. let the hook be No. 1, the

shank thsee inches or more in length, and small

at the end, in order that the head of the fly may

be made the neater : the feather for the wings

the darkish brown speckled, from the turkey

tail, and mixed with about twelve harls from the

peacocks tail, dividing them that there may be six

in each wing ; the next feathers for wings to these

large flies, are kite, buzzard, bittern, and herons

wings. The body of the first fly, called the tartan-

fly, is of four, five, or more different colours,

yellow light blue, green, dark red, orange, and

purple, and as many more colours as the fancy

may lead the angler to ; for the fork, or tails, use

the dark mottled feather from behind the wild

mallards wings, and a black and red cocks hackle

over the body, for the legs and head.

**How to make the Tartan-fly**. Take three

lengths of strong silk-worm gut, properly twisted

together, and having your silk well waxed (which

must be of a light brown copper-colour) whip it

round your gut six or seven times, about an inch,

or more, from the end, which will prevent the

shank of the hook from galling it ; then take the

hook, and put the end of the shank nearly to the

top of the silk, that the gut may be on the inside,

and begin to whip the hook to it, but desist when

you have gone about half a dozen rounds ; then

having a proper quantity of feather ready for the

wings, take it and lay it on the back of the

shank (keeping it close together, and as even as

you can) with the right side next the hook, and

the but-end downwards, leaving the other end to

be (when turned back again) full as long as the

hook ; then go on with your silk, and whip it

round your feather, hook, and gut, six or eight

times, or sufficient to make it fast, and with a pair

of fine scissors cut away what remains of the butend

of the feather, taking care not to hurt the gut,

which must be opened and twisted round the

shank of the hook as you go on with the whipping,

which is to be continued till it nearly comes

opposite the point of the hook (but you must cut off

the ends of the gut before they come quite so low

down, if found too long ;) next put on your strips

of feather for the forks at the tail, with the fine

points downwards, leaving them both exactly the

same length, rather more than an inch long, and

to stand open and make two laps round with the

silk ; then take the hackle (which must be ready

prepared by stripping off the downy part at top,

and cutting the feather across on each side near

to the stem, about two or three tenths of an inch

from the point, or by drawing the fibres back to

prevent any ofthem from being bound down by the

silk) and whip in the point of it two or three times

round, leaving the largest end and gold hanging

downwards, and the right uppermost, making one

lap round between it and the fork, and one below

all round the bare hook, tight and close to the

fork, and cut off the superfluous ends of it, if any

remain in sight ; then wax your silk afresh, and

having your stuff for the body, all the different

colours separate, take first of the brightest yellow

hogs wool, and twist as much of it on the silk

as will make four or five laps round the hook, then

as much more of dark red, of the same wool,

twist on the silk and make five or six laps at the

end of the yellow ; then take as much of green

and do it as before with five laps, and as much of

light blue in the same way ; as much dark orange

done in the same way, and as much black as

will bring you up to the wings, then fasten ; take

your needle and prick the body all round, and

make it even and straight ; then take your gold

plaiting, or twist, that hangs at the bend of the

hook, and work it gradually upwards till you come

close up to the feather for the wings, and fasten ;

then take your hackle and work it up neatly between

the lappings of gold, till you come close to

the but of the wings, make all fast by two or three

laps, and if any of the fibres remain, strip them,

off from the stem ; and untwisting the silk to its

proper place, make two or three laps to fasten the

hackle, and cut away what remains of the stem ;

then take the feather for the wings, which has lain

back all this time, and turn it down towards the

tail of the fly, and holding it down tightish, with

the rest between your finger and thumb, having

all the part of the hackle out of the way, whip it

two or three times round with the silk just over

the feather very tight, and then two or three laps

close above it ; wax the silk again a little, and

take a bit of copper-coloured mohair, and twist

it thin on your silk, and begin at the end of the

hook and lap it neatly four or five times up to the

back of the wings ; make two or three nooses close

to the wings, and finish the operation with completing

the head of the fly.

I have not used in this format classic hooks and gut, but I try to do more tight to pattern, of corse there are subtituted matherial. I hope that it will be critics and remarks.

from Macintosh Alexander partern The Tartan Fly

**CHAPTER XI.**

**OF SALMON FLIES.**

**THESE**, for the spring season, must be made

much larger, but not quite so gaudy as those

used in summer, viz. let the hook be No. 1, the

shank thsee inches or more in length, and small

at the end, in order that the head of the fly may

be made the neater : the feather for the wings

the darkish brown speckled, from the turkey

tail, and mixed with about twelve harls from the

peacock's tail, dividing them that there may be six

in each wing ; the next feathers for wings to these

large flies, are kite, buzzard, bittern, and heron's

wings. The body of the first fly, called the tartan-

fly, is of four, five, or more different colours,

yellow light blue, green, dark red, orange, and

purple, and as many more colours as the fancy

may lead the angler to ; for the fork, or tails, use

the dark mottled feather from behind the wild

mallard's wings, and a black and red cock's hackle

over the body, for the legs and head.

**How to make the Tartan-fly**. Take three

lengths of strong silk-worm gut, properly twisted

together, and having your silk well waxed (which

must be of a light brown copper-colour) whip it

round your gut six or seven times, about an inch,

or more, from the end, which will prevent the

shank of the hook from galling it ; then take the

hook, and put the end of the shank nearly to the

top of the silk, that the gut may be on the inside,

and begin to whip the hook to it, but desist when

you have gone about half a dozen rounds ; then

having a proper quantity of feather ready for the

wings, take it and lay it on the back of the

shank (keeping it close together, and as even as

you can) with the right side next the hook, and

the but-end downwards, leaving the other end to

be (when turned back again) full as long as the

hook ; then go on with your silk, and whip it

round your feather, hook, and gut, six or eight

times, or sufficient to make it fast, and with a pair

of fine scissors cut away what remains of the butend

of the feather, taking care not to hurt the gut,

which must be opened and twisted round the

shank of the hook as you go on with the whipping,

which is to be continued till it nearly comes

opposite the point of the hook (but you must cut off

the ends of the gut before they come quite so low

down, if found too long 😉 next put on your strips

of feather for the forks at the tail, with the fine

points downwards, leaving them both exactly the

same length, rather more than an inch long, and

to stand open and make two laps round with the

silk ; then take the hackle (which must be ready

prepared by stripping off the downy part at top,

and cutting the feather across on each side near

to the stem, about two or three tenths of an inch

from the point, or by drawing the fibres back to

prevent any ofthem from being bound down by the

silk) and whip in the point of it two or three times

round, leaving the largest end and gold hanging

downwards, and the right uppermost, making one

lap round between it and the fork, and one below

all round the bare hook, tight and close to the

fork, and cut off the superfluous ends of it, if any

remain in sight ; then wax your silk afresh, and

having your stuff for the body, all the different

colours separate, take first of the brightest yellow

hog's wool, and twist as much of it on the silk

as will make four or five laps round the hook, then

as much more of dark red, of the same wool,

twist on the silk and make five or six laps at the

end of the yellow ; then take as much of green

and do it as before with five laps, and as much of

light blue in the same way ; as much dark orange

done in the same way, and as much black as

will bring you up to the wings, then fasten ; take

your needle and prick the body all round, and

make it even and straight ; then take your gold

plaiting, or twist, that hangs at the bend of the

hook, and work it gradually upwards till you come

close up to the feather for the wings, and fasten ;

then take your hackle and work it up neatly between

the lappings of gold, till you come close to

the but of the wings, make all fast by two or three

laps, and if any of the fibres remain, strip them,

off from the stem ; and untwisting the silk to its

proper place, make two or three laps to fasten the

hackle, and cut away what remains of the stem ;

then take the feather for the wings, which has lain

back all this time, and turn it down towards the

tail of the fly, and holding it down tightish, with

the rest between your finger and thumb, having

all the part of the hackle out of the way, whip it

two or three times round with the silk just over

the feather very tight, and then two or three laps

close above it ; wax the silk again a little, and

take a bit of copper-coloured mohair, and twist

it thin on your silk, and begin at the end of the

hook and lap it neatly four or five times up to the

back of the wings ; make two or three nooses close

to the wings, and finish the operation with completing

the head of the fly.
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Great piece of 'period' tying. Dx

1 week ago

Here’s my attempt at Butcher. Tried to copy Richard’s one he posted a few days ago but didn’t exactly turn out that way. Overall I’m happy with it....for now! I always seem to think it looks ok but then I always spot the mistakes when I post the photo.

Here’s my attempt at Butcher. Tried to copy Richard’s one he posted a few days ago but didn’t exactly turn out that way. Overall I’m happy with it....for now! I always seem to think it looks ok but then I always spot the mistakes when I post the photo. ... See MoreSee Less

1 week ago

JUNGLE DON 3/0Image attachment

JUNGLE DON 3/0 ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Im glad to have this fly in my collection !! So beautiful !!

Awesome!buddy,😋👍

2 weeks ago

The Stunner from Tolfrey.
4/0 Allcock hook
Tied the tail in with the tag silk as it appears in the plate (same as Roberts sbs for the colonel).
Comments and critique always appreciated!Image attachment

The Stunner from Tolfrey.
4/0 Allcock hook
Tied the tail in with the tag silk as it appears in the plate (same as Robert's sbs for the colonel).
Comments and critique always appreciated!
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Very cool. Looks like a job well done to me.

No authority criticism from me! I believe your skills are spot on though!

Nice!

2 weeks ago

THE DRIFFIELD ANGLER BY ALEXANDER MACKINTOSH. 1821.

CHAPTER XI. OF SALMON FLIES.

108-109

A SIXTH, CALLED THE GOLDEN FLY.

For this fly, a hook No. 3, the shank near two

inches in length; the wings from the golden pheasant,

the common pheasant, the parrot, the peacocks

harl from the tail, the turkeys mottled feather

from the tail, and two blue mottled feathers

from the jays wings, one placed on each side of

the wings, with the mottled side downwards ; it

must be made very soft with your finger and

thumb, not breaking the crust of the stem that it

may lay more flat down to the other part of the

wings; it must be lapped on, before you finish

the head, by itself; all the other feathers must be

mixed equally alike, and a middling large wing,

but not longer than to the end of the hook ; finish

the head with a very little green mohair; the body,

broad gold plaiting, with a strong, bold, red cocks

hackle, ribbed with a piece of dark green silk ; the

body must be all of one thickness, about the size

of a wheat straw, and made with any kind of thick,

or round, silk ; at the same time lapping in the

hackle, silk, and gold plaiting, take the plaiting

and make two laps on the hook at the tail of the

fly, then lap the plaiting side by side till you come

to the but of the wings, and fasten ; take the green

silk and lap it neatly up, about the eighth of an

inch slanting from each other, to the wings as

before, and fasten ; then take the hackle, with both

the sides on, and lap it neatly between every lap

of the silk, and giving two laps under the wings

fasten your hackle; then bring the wings forward,

pressing them down to the tail of the fly, divide

the wings into two equal parts ; take your silk,

well waxed, and, crossing it three or four times

between them, make two or three laps behind

the wings, in order to throw them forwards, and

lay rather flat on the back of the fly than otherwise

; for the head take the ruddy harl of a peacocks

feather, and finish as before.

THE DRIFFIELD ANGLER BY ALEXANDER MACKINTOSH. 1821.

CHAPTER XI. OF SALMON FLIES.

108-109

A SIXTH, CALLED THE GOLDEN FLY.

For this fly, a hook No. 3, the shank near two

inches in length; the wings from the golden pheasant,

the common pheasant, the parrot, the peacock's

harl from the tail, the turkey's mottled feather

from the tail, and two blue mottled feathers

from the jay's wings, one placed on each side of

the wings, with the mottled side downwards ; it

must be made very soft with your finger and

thumb, not breaking the crust of the stem that it

may lay more flat down to the other part of the

wings; it must be lapped on, before you finish

the head, by itself; all the other feathers must be

mixed equally alike, and a middling large wing,

but not longer than to the end of the hook ; finish

the head with a very little green mohair; the body,

broad gold plaiting, with a strong, bold, red cock's

hackle, ribbed with a piece of dark green silk ; the

body must be all of one thickness, about the size

of a wheat straw, and made with any kind of thick,

or round, silk ; at the same time lapping in the

hackle, silk, and gold plaiting, take the plaiting

and make two laps on the hook at the tail of the

fly, then lap the plaiting side by side till you come

to the but of the wings, and fasten ; take the green

silk and lap it neatly up, about the eighth of an

inch slanting from each other, to the wings as

before, and fasten ; then take the hackle, with both

the sides on, and lap it neatly between every lap

of the silk, and giving two laps under the wings

fasten your hackle; then bring the wings forward,

pressing them down to the tail of the fly, divide

the wings into two equal parts ; take your silk,

well waxed, and, crossing it three or four times

between them, make two or three laps behind

the wings, in order to throw them forwards, and

lay rather flat on the back of the fly than otherwise

; for the head take the ruddy harl of a peacock's

feather, and finish as before.
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Didn’t see this until now. Thanks for sharing the text and your interpretation. I like it!

I can’t quite tell from the text... is the wing tied on before the body work?

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